The

Best Book of 2010: The Beads of Lapis Lazuli

In Books on 11 May, 2011 at 7:56 am

The best book of 2010, according to Outskirts Press, is a mystery novel mixing history and obsession with a liberal dose of the paranormal. The self-published work of author Doris Marcotte, The Beads of Lapis Lazuli was selected from among the three Colorado Independent Publishers Association EWY award winner to take home the top honor and the $1,500 Grand Prize from Outskirt Press.

“What a joy ride,” Marcotte enthused upon learning of her win. “It’s still hard to believe my little book has been so well-received!”

Prior to picking up her pen to write The Beads of Lapis Lazuli, Marcotte had studied the Minoan civilization for decades. Her extensive research and passion for the ancient civilization took her to the Athens National Museum, the British Museum in London and the Heraklion Archeological Museum on the island of Crete.

Lapis Lazuli beads

Beads made of lapis lazuli

That The Beads of Lapis Lazuli is a work of fiction, perhaps the most competitive genre among publishing award categories, makes Marcotte’s victory even sweeter and more impressive. Besides the $1,500 Grand Prize, The Beads of Lapis Lazuli will also be extensively promoted by Outskirts Press, one of the world’s fastest growing self-publishing and book marketing companies.

“What an accomplishment,” said Brent Sampson, president and CEO of Outskirts Press. “Doris has demonstrated the possibilities that exist when a talented and tenacious writer sets her mind on a goal. Her book is a product of excellence — a finely woven story with rich characters encompassed within a package brimming with production values: professional copyediting, a gorgeous custom cover, an enhanced interior, cover scribing and more.”

Advertisements
  1. […] Best Book of 2010: The Beads of Lapis Lazuli Preternatural PostPrior to picking up her pen to write The Beads of Lapis Lazuli, Marcotte had studied the Minoan civilization for decades. Her extensive research and passion for the ancient civilization took her to the Athens National Museum, … […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: